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Virtual Dissection & Biology Labs

Froguts Inc (www.froguts.com) is a leading provider of biology and science simulations for K-12 & Higher Education. Our computer simulations of dissections and labs for K-12 and higher education engage students with immersive and interactive 3-D simulations of anatomy and physiology. We believe integrating virtual labs into schools and home use significantly enhances content retention. We are working to ensure more schools ...more »

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Try the Poietic Generator?

The Poietic Generator is a 100% human "Game of Life" known as one of the historical works of digital art (1986). It has not yet become mainstream because it probably raised questions which were quite ahead of its time. But its time may have come? The new version of the PG works on every mobile device and can be practiced by anyone, regardless of age, language, culture and level of education. The living image made by ...more »

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Species Photo Journal/LifeList

There is a fascination with being able to identify animals, flowers, trees, etc. Species identification can be fun, if approached as a photo journal/life list. Done as a game with scores and even social media postings, a series of games could be quite dynamic. Partnering Smithsonian, National Geographic, National Parks, the animal guides (Petersons, etc.), Sierra Club, Audubon Society, etc. would be required to ensure ...more »

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Three good STEM games - physics and electronics

I've found good learning games hard to find. Many are boring, most teach only a bit of knowledge (facts) but not skills or deeper understanding. But two gems are "The Incredible Machine" and "Fantastic Contraption" In both these games you have to build a contraption using wheels, levers, motors, etc. Building these contraptions you learn how gravity, leverage, balance, and other physics concepts work. And by "learn how ...more »

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Exercise Reason

So much human misery results from distorted decision-making. Bad purchases. Bad career moves. Bad surgeries. Bad wars. And of course, bad science.

 

In an immersive and plot-driven adventure game, players can learn to recognize cognitive biases and to avoid the dangerous traps that biases present. This promises to improve the quality of decisions the players later make in the real world.

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