Great examples

What is the most compelling and effective game for impact? What is it about this game that makes it particularly powerful? Is there evidence that this game can help solve an important societal challenge?

Great examples

Eco Challenge 2.0 explores water management.

With the UNEP calling it a global water crisis the need for better understanding of water and sustainability has never been greater. In an effort to bridge the gap in understanding this game event seeks to engage 11-17 year old students in taking control of a water supply in a fictional world of "Aqua Republica". More details at http://curtin.edu.au/ecochallenge.

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2 votes

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Share Research Results through Games

Videogames provide a promising way for sharing research results with adult audiences, thereby increasing the impact of knowledge Law of the Jungle is a free game developed at Harvey Mudd College that translates insights from the social science research on what it will take to protect tropical forests. Geared toward Grade 11 through adults See rulechangers.org

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2 votes

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Assessing and Teaching Social-Emotional Skills through Games

Many parents and educators have concerns about the potential negative effects of gaming on children’s social skills. But 3C Institute, a research and development company, is turning this idea on its head and developing evidence-based intelligent games designed to help children improve their social-emotional development. 3C Institute has created Zoo U Assessment, an evidence-based computer game that assesses social skills... more »

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1 vote

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Neocolonialism

Neocolonialism (subalterngames.com) is a Marxist strategy game in which you attempt to extract as much wealth from the world as possible. 1-6 players buy government votes, manipulate regional parliaments, enact free trade agreements, and ultimately attempt to siphon capital into their secret Swiss bank accounts. You will negotiate, you will betray, you will pillage the world and ruin everything.

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At-Risk in Primary Care

At-Risk in Primary Care is a role-playing game that prepares primary care providers to recognize when a patient’s physical ailments may be masking underlying mental health disorders, and to build a treatment plan that engages the patient and integrates mental health so that the causes of the symptoms are addressed and treated. The game was developed in collaboration with the New York City Department of Health and Mental... more »

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Veterans on Campus

Veterans on Campus is a role-playing game designed to educate student veterans how to best support their fellow student veterans who face challenges in transitioning to college life, including isolation, cultural disparities, academic difficulties, time management, and mental-health issues such as TBI, depression, and PTSD. In the game, players engage in a series of virtual role-play conversations with emotionally responsive... more »

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Family of Heroes: A PTSD & Resiliency Game for Military Families

Family of Heroes is an evidence-based, role-playing game designed to help military families build the resiliency and communication skills to manage the challenges involved in adjusting to post deployment life and to increase service utilization by their veterans and service members who experience PTSD, TBI, depression, or suicidal ideation. In the game, users enter a virtual environment and engage in three conversations... more »

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